Jay V. Solnick

/Jay V. Solnick
Jay V. Solnick 2017-09-28T22:23:40+00:00

Jay V. Solnick, M.D., Ph.D.

Infectious Diseases Unit
Core Scientist

Professor
Dept. of Microbiology and Immunology
School of Medicine

Research

Dr. Solnick has maintained a long-standing research program on the pathogenesis of Helicobacter pylori, using mice and macaque animal models, as well as translational studies in humans.  His current work seeks to understand how the bacterium modulates expression of outer membrane protein adhesins and the type IV secretion system, in order to “tune” the host inflammatory response to its own purposes and establish chronic infection.

Helicobacter pylori

Most of those infected will not have any clinical disease due to H. pylori infection, and may even be healthier because of it. But about 10% will develop peptic ulcer or gastric cancer, the second most common cause of cancer death worldwide.  Therefore, one key goal in the field is to develop biomarkers that can distinguish those who are likely to get ill and need more frequent evaluation, from those who will remain asymptomatic.  The Solnick lab has developed an interdisciplinary and international translational project to identify protein and glycan biomarkers that can be used to identify those infected patients at increased risk of gastric cancer.

Email Dr. Solnick

Visit Dr. Solnick’s UC Davis webpage

Highlight summary of Dr. Solnick’s research (PDF)

Publications

Link to Dr. Solnick’s PubMed publications

Solnick, JV, Eaton, KA, and Peek, RM Jr.  Animal models of Helicobacter pylori Infection, Chapter 11 in Backert and Yamaoka, Helicobacter pylori, Springer, expected publication 2016.

 

Helicobacter pylori

Most of those infected will not have any clinical disease due to H. pylori infection, and may even be healthier because of it. But about 10% will develop peptic ulcer or gastric cancer, the second most common cause of cancer death worldwide. Therefore, one key goal in the field is to develop biomarkers that can distinguish those who are likely to get ill and need more frequent evaluation, from those who will remain asymptomatic. The Solnick lab has developed an interdisciplinary and international translational project to identify protein and glycan biomarkers that can be used to identify those infected patients at increased risk of gastric cancer.

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