Primate Assay Laboratory Core

/Primate Assay Laboratory Core
Primate Assay Laboratory Core 2017-10-18T16:55:11+00:00

Primate Assay Laboratory Core

The Primate Assay Laboratory Core encompasses the laboratories formerly known as the Endocrinology Core and Pathogen Detection Laboratory Core.

Endocrinology

Endocrinology provides an international service for hormone analysis as well as consultation relating to endocrine research for investigators. Endocrinology’s emphasis focuses on the analysis of biological specimens for reproductive and metabolic hormones. In addition, this laboratory develops and validates unique steroid and protein hormone assays for use in research conducted with nonhuman primates. Services include steroid and protein hormone immunoassays in a variety of species from blood and/or urine samples as well as cell-based bioassays in serum samples.

Pathogen Detection Laboratory

The Pathogen Detection Laboratory offers antibody, antigen, virus, DNA, RNA and other diagnostic marker detection for a number of infectious agents. All methods and reagents are validated, standardized, and controlled by in-laboratory studies and proficiency testing using reference banks of characterized specimens. Quantitation is available by arrangement. Test results are reviewed by clinical laboratory personnel who are fully accredited by the American Society for Clinical Pathology and Laboratory Field Services of the State of California. Custom testing including immunological and virological assays, training, and consultation are available; please inquire. In addition, SIV virus stocks, reagents and controls are available through Resource Services. PDL is a resource for Specific Pathogen-Free (SPF) colonies, field or epidemiological studies, research protocols, and atypical case resolution.

Click here for a special PDL announcement 

Endocrinology

  • Sensitive macaque and human chorionic gonadotropin assays for early pregnancy determination
  • Routine reproductive endocrine assays such as serum dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS), estradiol, progesterone and testosterone
  • Urinary metabolites of estrogen, progesterone and follicle stimulating hormone (FSH)
  • Cell-mediated bioassays for total estrogen or androgen receptor ligand loads and luteinizng hormone
  • Metabolic endocrine assays such as adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), cortisol, insulin, prolactin and thyroid hormones
  • Other assays (including analysis of human samples) available upon request – please contact us for additional information
  • Development of new assays as needed
  • Assistance in experimental design and collection/preparation of samples
  • Evaluation of reproductive status

Pathogen Detection Laboratory

  • Specialty lab testing and expert consultation services to both the public and private sector. This includes local, regional, national and international research colonies; zoological collections; veterinary laboratories; and practices of all sizes.
  • Methods and reagents validated, standardized, and controlled by in-laboratory studies and proficiency testing.
  • Maintenance of reference banks of characterized specimens
  • All test results reviewed by qualified senior personnel prior to reporting
  • Resource for development and maintenance of Specific Pathogen-free (SPF) colonies
  • Resource for field or epidemiological studies
  • Resource for laboratory baseline and monitoring of animals on research studies
  • Resource for unusual or atypical diagnostic cases

Select Publications from Endocrinology Activities

Kennedy RC, Menn FM, Healy L, Fecteau KA, Hu P, Bae J, Gee NA, Lasley BL, Zhao L, Chen J. Early life triclocarban exposure during lactation affects neonate rat survival. Reprod Sci. 2015 Jan;22(1):75-89. doi: 10.1177/1933719114532844. PMID: 24803507

Yau VM, Lutsky M, Yoshida CK, Lasley B, Kharrazi M, Windham G, Gee N, Croen LA. Prenatal and Neonatal Thyroid Stimulating Hormone Levels and Autism Spectrum Disorders. J Autism Dev Disord Mar 45(3): 719-730, 2015. PMID: 25178989 [PubMed – in process]

Moran FM, Chen J, Gee NA, Lohstroh PN, Lasley BL. Dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate levels reflect endogenous luteinizing hormone production and response to human chorionic gonadotropin challenge in older female macaque (Macaca fascicularis). Menopause 20(3):329-35, 2013. PMCID: PMC3546135, PMID 23435031.

Baxter MG, Roberts MT, Gee NA, Lasley BL, Morrison JH, Rapp PR. Multiple clinically relevant hormone therapy regimens fail to improve cognitive function in aged ovariectomized rhesus monkeys. Neurobiol Aging 34(7):1882-90, 2013. PMCID: PMC3622837, PMID 23369546

Conley AJ, Stanczyk FZ, Morrison JH, Borowicz P, Benirschke K, Gee NA, Lasley BL. Modulation of higher-primate adrenal androgen secretion with estrogen-alone or estrogen-plus-progesterone intervention. Menopause 20(3):322-8, 2013. PMCID: PMC3610787, PMID 23435030

Kundu MC, May MC, Chosich J, Bradford AP, Lasley B, Gee N, Santoro N, Appt SE, Polotsky AJ. Assessment of luteal function in the vervet monkey as a means to develop a model for obesity-related reproductive phenotype. Syst Biol Reprod Med 59(2):74-81, 2013. PMID 23278149

Lasley BL, Crawford SL, McConnell DS. Ovarian adrenal interactions during the menopausal transition. Minerva Ginecol. 2013 Dec;65(6):641-51. PMCID: PMC4417336

Young ME, Ohm DT, Janssen WG, Gee NA, Lasley BL, Morrison JH. Continuously delivered ovarian steroids do not alter dendritic spine density or morphology in macaque dorsolateral prefrontal cortical neurons. Neuroscience 255:219-25, 2013. PMCID: PMC3957098, PMID 24120552

Fan X, Krieg S, Hwang JY, Dhal S, Kuo CJ, Lasley BL, Brenner RM, Nayak NR. Dynamic regulation of Wnt7a expression in the primate endometrium: implications for postmenstrual regeneration and secretory transformation. Endocrinology 153(3):1063-9, 2012. PMCID: PMC3281546, PMID 22294752

Ohm DT, Bloss EB, Janssen WG, Dietz KC, Wadsworth S, Lou W, Gee NA, Lasley BL, Rapp PR, Morrison JH. Clinically relevant hormone treatments fail to induce spinogenesis in prefrontal cortex of aged female rhesus monkeys. J Neurosci 32(34):11700-5, 2012. PMCID: PMC3657730, PMID 22915112

Plopper CG, Joad JP, Miller LA, Schelegle ES, Fanucchi MV, Van Winkle LS, Tyler NK, Avdalovic MV, Evans MJ, Lasley WL, Buckpitt AR, Pinkerton KE, Tarkington BK, Davis S, Nishio SJ, Gershwin LJ, Wu R, Hyde DM. Lung effects of inhaled corticosteroids in a rhesus monkey model of childhood asthma. Clin Exp Allergy. 2012 Jul;42(7):1104-18. PMCID: PMC3913647

Yon L, Faulkner B, Kanchanapangka S, Chaiyabutr N, Meepan S, Lasley B. A safer method for studying hormone metabolism in an Asian elephant (Elephas maximus): accelerator mass spectrometry. Zoo Biol 29(6):760-6, 2010. PMID 20127658

Mohr FC, Lasley B, Bursian S. Fuel oil-induced adrenal hypertrophy in ranch mink (Mustela vison): effects of sex, fuel oil weathering, and response to adrenocorticotropic hormone. J Wildl Dis 46(1):103-10, 2010. PMID 20090023

Mohr FC, Lasley B, Bursian S. Chronic oral exposure to bunker C fuel oil causes adrenal insufficiency in ranch mink (Mustela vison). Arch Environ Contam Toxicol 54(2):337-47, 2008. PMID 17763884

Santoro N, Crawford SL, Lasley WL, Luborsky JL, Matthews KA, McConnell D, Randolph JF Jr, Gold EB, Greendale GA, Korenman SG, Powell L, Sowers MF, Weiss G. Factors related to declining luteal function in women during the menopausal transition. J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2008 May;93(5):1711-21. PMCID: PMC2386686

Yon L, Chen J, Moran P, Lasley B. An analysis of the androgens of musth in the Asian bull elephant (Elephas maximus). Gen Comp Endocrinol 155(1):109-15, 2008. PMID 17466989

Hao J, Rapp PR, Janssen WG, Lou W, Lasley BL, Hof PR, Morrison JH. Interactive effects of age and estrogen on cognition and pyramidal neurons in monkey prefrontal cortex. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 104(27):11465-70, 2007. PMCID: PMC2040921, PMID 17592140

Lohstroh P, Laughlin L, Gee N, Lasley B. Development, validation and application of a chemiluminescent immunoassay for the measurement of circulating chorionic gonadotropin levels in the laboratory macaque. J Med Primatol 36(3):164-9, 2007. PMID 17517091

Yon L, Kanchanapangka S, Chaiyabutr N, Meepan S, Stanczyk FZ, Dahl N, Lasley B. A longitudinal study of LH, gonadal and adrenal steroids in four intact Asian bull elephants (Elephas maximus) and one castrate African bull (Loxodonta africana) during musth and non-musth periods. Gen Comp Endocrinol 151(3):241-5, 2007. PMID 17350012

Yon L, Kanchanapangka S, Chaiyabutr N, Stanczyk F, Meepan S, Lasley B. ACTH stimulation in four Asian bull elephants (Elephas maximus): an investigation of androgen sources in bull elephants. Gen Comp Endocrinol 151(3):246-51, 2007. PMID 17350010

Browne P, Conley AJ, Spraker T, Ream RR, Lasley BL. Sex steroid concentrations and localization of steroidogenic enzyme expression in free-ranging female northern fur seals (Callorhinus ursinus). Gen Comp Endocrinol 147(2):175-83, 2006. PMID 16473352

Santoro N, Torrens J, Crawford S, Allsworth JE, Finkelstein JS, Gold EB, Korenman S, Lasley WL, Luborsky JL, McConnell D, Sowers MF, Weiss G. Correlates of circulating androgens in mid-life women: the study of women’s health across the nation. J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2005 Aug;90(8):4836-45. PMID: 15840738

Stevens RG, Cohen RD, Terry MB, Lasley BL, Siiteri P, Cohn BA. Alcohol consumption and serum hormone levels during pregnancy. Alcohol 36(1):47-53, 2005. PMID 16257353

Schwartz JA, Aldridge BM, Lasley BL, Snyder PW, Stott JL, Mohr FC. Chronic fuel oil toxicity in American mink (Mustela vison): systemic and hematological effects of ingestion of a low-concentration of bunker C fuel oil. Toxicol Appl Pharmacol 200(2):146-58, 2004. PMID 15476867

Select Publications from PDL Activities

Evans TS, Barry PA, Gilard KV, Goldstein T, Deere JD, Fike J, Yee J, Ssebide BJ, Karmacharya D, Cranfield MR, Wolking D, Smith B, Mazet JAK, Johnson CK. Optimization of a novel non-invasive oral sampling technique for zoonotic pathogen surveillance in nonhuman primates. PLOS Published: June 5, 2015 •DOI: 10.1371/journal.pntd.0003813

Yee JL, NPRC Breeding Colony Management Consortium, McChesney MB, Christe KL. Multi-Center Safety and Immunogenicity Trial of an Attenuated Measles Vaccine (MVacTM) for Nonhuman Primates. Comp Med. 2015. In press.

Van Rompay KK, Hunter Z, Jayashankar K, Peabody J, Montefiori D, Labranche CC, Keele BF, Jensen K, Abel K, Chackerian B. A vaccine against CCR5 protects a subset of macaques upon intravaginal challenge with Simian immunodeficiency virus SIVmac251. J Virol 88(4):2011-2024, 2014. PMID 24307581

Jensen K, Pena MG, Wilson RL, Ranganathan UD, Jacobs WR Jr, Fennelly G, Larsen M, Van Rompay KK, Kozlowski PA, Abel K. A neonatal oral Mycobacterium tuberculosis-SIV prime / intramuscular MVA-SIV boost combination vaccine induces both SIV and Mtb-specific immune responses in infant macaques. Trials Vaccinol 2:53-63, 2013. PMID 24454591

Tanaka T, Lerche NW, Farver TB, Ardeshir A, Kass PH. Specific-pathogen-free status is associated with lower infant mortality rate in rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) colonies at the California National Primate Research Center. J Med Primatol 42(4):186-91, 2013. PMID 23586439

Lemoy MJ, Westworth DR, Ardeshir A, Tarara RP. Reference intervals for preprandial and postprandial serum bile acid in adult rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta). J Am Assoc Lab Anim Sci. 52(4):444-7, 2013. PMCID: PMC3725928, PMID 23849441

Yee J, Montiel NA, Ardeshir A, Lerche NW. Constitutive release of interferon (IFN)-γ and interleukin (IL)-2 from peripheral blood mononuclear cells of healthy rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) infected with simian T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (STLV1). Comp Med. 63(6): 508-514. 2013.PMID 24326227

Ardeshir A, Oslund KL, Ventimiglia F, Yee J, Lerche NW, and Hyde DM. Idiopathic microscopic colitis of rhesus macaques: Quantitative assessment of colonic mucosa. Anat Rec (Hoboken) 296: 1169-1179, 2013. PMID 23775860

Jones-Engel L, Feeroz M, Soliven K, Small C, Engel G, Pacheco A, Yee J, Wang X, Hasa K, Oh G, Levine K, Alam S, Craig K, Jackson D, Lee E, Barry P, Lerche N, Escalante A, Matsen F, Lineal M. Population dynamics of rhesus macaques and associated foamy virus in Bangladesh. EMI 2013. PMCID: PMC3675400

Van Rompay KK. The use of nonhuman primate models of HIV infection for the evaluation of antiviral strategies. AIDS Res Hum Retroviruses 28(1):16-35, 2012. PMID 21902451

Jensen K, Ranganathan UDK, Van Rompay KKA, Canfield DR, Khan I, Ravindran R, Luciw PA, Jacobs WR, Fennelly G, Larsen M, and Abel K. A recombinant attenuated Mycobacterium tuberculosis vaccine strain is safe in immunosuppressed SIV-infected infant macaques. Clin Vaccine Immunol 19:1170-81 2012. PMCID: PMC3416096, PMID 22695156

Montiel NA, Todd PA, Yee J, and Lerche NW. Effects of simian betaretrovirus serotype 1 (SRV1) infection on the differentiation of hematopoietic progenitor cells (CD34+) derived from bone marrow of rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta). Comp Med 62: 61-68, 2012. PMCID: PMC3276394, PMID 22330653

Broadhurst MJ, Ardeshir A, Kanwar B, Mirpuri J, Gundra UM, Leung JM, Wiens KE, Vujkovic-Cvijin I, Kim CC, Yarovinsky F, Lerche NW, McCune JM, and Loke Pn. Therapeutic helminth infection of macaques with idiopathic chronic diarrhea alters the inflammatory signature and mucosal microbiota of the colon. PLoS Pathog 8: e1003000, 2012. PMCID: PMC3499566, PMID 23166490

Marthas ML, Van Rompay KK, Abbott Z, Earl P, Buonocore-Buzzelli L, Moss B, Rose NF, Rose JK, Kozlowski PA, Abel K. Partial efficacy of a VSV-SIV/MVA-SIV vaccine regimen against oral SIV challenge in infant macaques. Vaccine 29(17):3124-37, 2011. PMCID: PMC3078946, PMID 21377510

Kelly KR, Pypendop BH, Grayson JK, Stanley SD, Christe KL, Summers LM, and Lerche NW. Pharmacokinetics of oxymorphone in titi monkeys (Callicebus spp.) and rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta). J Am Assoc Lab Anim Sci. 50: 212-20, 2011. PMCID: PMC3061422, PMID 21439215

Chen EC, Yagi S, Kelly KR, Mendoza SP, Tarara RP, Canfield DR, Maninger N, Rosenthal A, Spinner A, Bales KL, Schnurr DP, Lerche NW, and Chiu CY. Cross-species transmission of a novel adenovirus associated with a fulminant pneumonia outbreak in a new world monkey colony. PLoS Pathog 7: e1002155, 2011. PMCID: PMC3136464, PMID 21779173

White JA, Yang X, Todd PA, Lerche NW. Longitudinal patterns of viremia and oral shedding of rhesus rhadinovirus and retroperitoneal fibromatosis herpesviruses in age-structured captive breeding populations of rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta). Comp Med 61(1):60-70, 2011. PMCID: PMC3060420, PMID 21819683

Luciw PA, Oslund KL, Yang X-w, Adamson L, Ravindran R, Canfield DR, Tarara R, Hirst L, Christensen M, Lerche NW, Offenstein H, Lewinsohn D, Ventimiglia F, Brignolo L, Wisner ER, and Hyde DM. Stereologic analysis of bacterial load and lung lesions in nonhuman primates (rhesus macaques) experimentally infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Am J Physiol Lung Cell Mol Physiol 301: 731-738, 2011. PMCID: PMC3213984, PMID 21873450

Liao Q, Guo H, Tang M, Touzjian N, Lerche NW, Lu Y, and Yee JL. Simultaneous detection of antibodies to five simian viruses in nonhuman primates using recombinant viral protein based multiplex microbead immunoassays. J Virol Methods 178: 143-152, 2011. PMCID: PMC3213204, PMID 21945221

Van Rompay KK, Abel K, Earl P, Kozlowski PA, Easlick J, Moore J, Buonocore-Buzzelli L, Schmidt KA, Wilson RL, Simon I, Moss B, Rose N, Rose J and Marthas ML. Immunogenicity of viral vector, prime-boost SIV vaccine regimens in infant rhesus macaques: attenuated vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) and modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA) recombinant SIV vaccines compared to live-attenuated SIV. Vaccine 28(6):1481-1492, 2010. PMCID: PMC2822069, PMID 19995539

von Gegerfelt A, Valentin A, Alicea C, Van Rompay KK, Marthas ML, Montefiori DC, Pavlakis GN, and Felber BK. Emergence of Simian immunodeficiency virus-specific cytotoxic CD4+ T Cells and increased humoral responses correlate with control of rebounding viremia in CD8-depleted macaques infected with rev-independent live-attenuated Simian immunodeficiency virus. J Immunol 185(6):3348-58, 2010. PMID 20702730

Winters MA, Van Rompay KK, Kashuba AD, Shulman NS, and Holodniy M. Maternal-fetal pharmacokinetics and dynamics of a single intrapartum dose of maraviroc in rhesus macaques. Antimicrob Agents Chemother 54(10):4059-4063, 2010. PMCID: PMC2944591, PMID 20696881

Van Rompay KK. Evaluation of antiretrovirals in animal models of HIV infection. Antiviral Res 85(1):159-175, 2010. PMID 19622373

Zao CL, Armstrong K, Tomanek L, Cooke A, Berger R, Estep JS, Marx PA, Trask JS, Smith DG, Yee JL, and Lerche NW. The complete genome and genetic characteristics of SRV-4 isolated from cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis). Virology 405: 390-396, 2010. PMCID: PMC2941434, PMID 20615522

Kanthaswamy S, Kou A, Satkoski J, Penedo MC, Ward T, Ng J, Gill L, Lerche NW, Erickson B J, and Smith DG. Genetic characterization of specific pathogen-free rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) populations at the California National Primate Research Center (CNPRC). Am J Primatol 72: 587-599, 2010. PMCID: PMC2941796, PMID 20162538

Oates-O’Brien RS, Farver TB, Anderson-Vicino KC, McCowan B, and Lerche NW. Predictors of matrilineal overthrows in large captive breeding groups of rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta). J Am Assoc Lab Anim Sci 49: 196-201, 2010. PMCID: PMC2846008, PMID 20353695

Lerche NW. Simian retroviruses: infection and disease – implications for immunotoxicology research in primates. J Immunotoxicol 7: 93-101, 2010. PMID 20433415

Olivier KJ, Jr, Price KD, Hutto DL, Lerche NW, Mansfield KG, Simmons JH, Taylor K, Myers L P, Ouyang Y, and Evans EW. Naturally occurring infections in non-human primates (NHP) and immunotoxicity implications: discussion sessions. J Immunotoxicol 7: 138-146, 2010. PMID 20441554

Farkas T, Cross RW, Hargitt E, 3rd, Lerche NW, Morrow AL, and Sestak K. Genetic diversity and histo-blood group antigen interactions of rhesus enteric caliciviruses. J Virol 84: 8617-8625, 2010. PMCID: PMC2919043, PMID 20554772

Zao CL, Armstrong K, Tomanek L, Cooke A, Berger R, Estep JS, Marx PA, Trask JS, Smith DG, Yee JL, and Lerche NW. The complete genome and genetic characteristics of SRV-4 isolated from cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis). Virology 405: 390-396, 2010. PMCID: PMC2941434, PMID 20615522

Chen CI, Clark DC, Pesavento P, Lerche NW, Luciw PA, Reisen WK, and Brault AC. Comparative pathogenesis of epidemic and enzootic Chikungunya viruses in a pregnant rhesus macaque model. Am J Trop Med Hyg 83: 1249-1258, 2010. PMCID: PMC2990040, PMID 21118930

Durand-Gasselin L, Van Rompay KK, Vela JE, Henne IN, Lee WA, Rhodes GR, and Ray AS. Nucleotide analogue prodrug Tenofovir Disoproxil enhances lymphoid cell loading following oral administration in monkeys. Mol Pharm 6(4):1145-51, 2009. PMCID: PMC2777719, PMID 19545170

Fairman J, Moore J, Lemieux M, Van Rompay KK, Geng Y, Warner J, and Abel K. Enhanced in vivo immunogenicity of SIV vaccine candidates with cationic liposome-DNA complexes in a rhesus macaque pilot study. Hum Vaccin 5(3):141-50, 2009. PMCID: PMC2728146, PMID 18690014

Rosati M, Bergamaschi C, Valentin A, Kulkarni V, Jalah R, Alicea C, Patel V, von Gegerfelt AS, Montefiori DC, Venzon DJ, Khan AS, Draghia-Akli R, Van Rompay KK, Felber BK, and Pavlakis GN. DNA vaccination in rhesus macaques induces potent immune responses and decreases acute and chronic viremia after SIVmac251 challenge. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 106(37):15832-6, 2009. PMCID: PMC2734879, PMID 19717425

Endocrinology FAQ’s

Endocrinology Samples / Shipping Information

  • Advanced scheduling is required. This allows for the quickest turnaround time.
  • Our receiving is open Monday-Friday, 8am – 4pm except holidays.

To schedule samples email (preferred) or call:
Email: endocore@ucdavis.edu
Phone: (530) 752-8662

Turnaround time varies and is dependent on number of samples/analytes; please contact us for further information.

Email: endocore@ucdavis.edu
Phone: (530) 752-8662

All specimens must be scheduled and should be accompanied by a complete inventory!

  • All samples should be frozen in polypropylene cryovials
  • Volume and size of vial will be dependent on the assays requested. Please contact us (endocore@ucdavis.edu) for this information.
  • Specimens should be packed in leak-proof containers and shipped overnight on dry ice.

All packages must be addressed to:
Nancy Gee
Primate Assay Laboratory Core – Endocrinology
California National Primate Research Center

University of California, Davis
County Road 98 & Hutchison Drive
Davis, CA 95616

  • Circulating hormone and protein assays require particulate-free serum. Volume is dependent on analytes requested. Please contact us for information specific to your request.
  • Urinary metabolites require centrifuged and particulate-free urine. Volume is dependent on analytes requested. Please contact us for information specific to your request.

Email: endocore@ucdavis.edu

Phone: (530) 752-8662

  • 2017 Holidays:  please do not send samples the weeks of  22-24, 2017, and Dec. 20, 2017 to Jan. 1, 2018 without making prior arrangements to accommodate University holidays.

PDL FAQ’s

PDL Samples / Shipping Information

Please complete the following form(s) and email to PDL.

To avoid compatibility issues with different browsers and PDF software, we recommend that you save these forms to your computer before entering data; and then save or print a copy for your records.

  • Advanced scheduling is NOT necessary. However, for fastest turnaround advanced scheduling is recommended.
  • If you choose not to schedule in advance, please notify us when samples are sent so that we may confirm their arrival. For best results, you may also e-mail or fax us the submission form.
  • Our receiving is open Monday-Friday, 8am – 4pm except holidays.

 

To schedule samples call, fax or email:
PDL Staff at (530) 752-8242
Fax (530) 752-4816.
cnprc-pdl@ucdavis.edu

 Maximum turnaround time for results is 2 weeks for serology and PCR. Turnaround time for custom testing varies; please contact us for further information.

PDL Staff at (530) 752-8242
Fax (530) 752-4816.
PDL@primate.ucdavis.edu

All specimens must be accompanied by a completed submission form!

  • For serum or plasma:
  • The preferred specimen is at least 1 cc serum frozen in an externally threaded polypropylene cryo vial (i.e. Nunc #375418, Sarstedt #72.694). Do not overfill the vial. The vial should be labeled with a sample identification # and draw date. Specimens should be properly packed in a leakproof double walled container with absorbent material and ice packs or dry ice and shipped by overnight delivery.
  • For Whole Blood, EDTA Blood and Heperinized Blood:
  • The specimen requirement is 3 cc heparinized whole blood (use an appropriately sized tube for the volume so the Heparin/Blood ratio is correct) properly packed in a leakproof double walled container with absorbent material and shipped at ambient temperature by priority overnight delivery. Please email or fax completed submission form when the samples are sent.
  • Dry Blood Spots, DNA or Saliva may also be sent. Call or email for more information before shipping these sample types.

All packages must be addressed to:
JoAnn Yee
Pathogen Detection Laboratory
Primate Center
County Road 98 at Hutchison
University of California
Davis, CA 95616

All specimens must be accompanied by a completed submission form!

  • For Antibody Screens, Western Blots, IFA’s, ELISA’s, EIA’s send:
  • Serum or plasma
  • The preferred specimen is at least 1 cc serum frozen in an externally threaded polypropylene cryo vial (i.e. Nunc #375418, Sarstedt #72.694). Do not overfill the vial. The vial should be labeled with a sample identification # and draw date. Specimens should be properly packed in a leakproof double walled container with absorbent material and ice packs or dry ice and shipped by overnight delivery.
  • Whole Blood, EDTA Blood and Heperinized Blood
  • The specimen requirement is 3 cc heparinized whole blood (use an appropriately sized tube for the volume so the Heparin/Blood ratio is correct) properly packed in a leakproof double walled container with absorbent material and shipped at ambient temperature by priority overnight delivery. Please email or fax completed submission form when the samples are sent.
  • For PCR send:
  • Heperinized Blood:
  • The specimen requirement is 3 cc heparinized whole blood (use an appropriately sized tube for the volume so the Heparin/Blood ratio is correct) properly packed in a leakproof double walled container with absorbent material and shipped at ambient temperature by priority overnight delivery. Please email or fax completed submission form when the samples are sent.
  • For GIFN (TB):
  • Please contact laboratory personnel for sample collection instructions prior to drawing samples.
  • For custom testing or other:
  • Please contact laboratory personnel for sample collection instructions prior to drawing samples.
  • Dry Blood Spots, DNA or Saliva may also be sent.

Call or email for more information before shipping these sample types.

To schedule samples call, fax or email:
PDL Staff at (530) 752-8242
Fax (530) 752-4816.
cnprc-pdl@ucdavis.edu

Current Updates and Holiday Schedule

  • 2017 Holidays:  please do not plan on sending samples the weeks of Nov. 22-24, 2017, and Dec. 20, 2017 to Jan. 1, 2018 without contacting us first so we can make arrangements with our receiving department to accommodate university holidays.

PDL has been busy this summer.  We are continuing to validate new assays and instruments to enhance our ability to meet your testing needs.

  • A Thermo Fisher Quant Studio for real time PCR is now on line
  • A new SIV virus stock is now available for research use
  • Additional custom DNA extraction methods, antibody, and cytokine panels with applications beyond infectious disease have been validated- please contact us for details
  • Since the Primagam test is still not available we have revived our previous work to development our own laboratory based cytokine release assay for TB. Until we have acquired positive validation samples to test for sensitivity, the assay is not yet available for diagnostic use- but we are working on it!

Please contact about these or any other testing needs for your work.  We have a number of new ideas and assays in progress and available on a custom basis.

It’s hard to think about Fall and Winter when the weather here is in the triple digits but the end of the year will be here before we know it.

Endocrinology 

An endocrine service at CNPRC was informally created in the late 1960s. At that time, Dr. Lasley was a graduate student whose dissertation focused on the development and application of hormone assays to document day-to-day changes in ovarian function in the laboratory macaque.  This resulted in the first hormone profiles that characterized the reproductive cycle of the laboratory macaque.  This effort brought some of the first practical assays for circulating sex steroids hormones which were soon shared with research scientists.  This “sharing” or informal “service” was focused on research and, with informal collaborative agreements, served to forge new interdisciplinary studies.  A formal endocrine service was not formulated until Dr. Lasley returned to the Center years later with a broader array of assays that could be used in a wider range of research studies.

The endocrine service continued to evolve and became the sole source of many materials and protocols used in monitoring reproductive function in a wide range of primate species, including humans.  The number of endocrine assays had grown to include peptide and protein hormones and it became necessary to develop and validate each assay on a species-specific basis. Methods were developed to offer more economical, reliable and sensitive chemiluminescent assays. A closer relationship with the Clinical Laboratory was also forged and metabolic hormone assays were added to the service. Currently, Endocrinology is a resource for both national and international investigators as it unites with the Pathogen Detection Laboratory to form the Primate Assay Laboratory Core.

Pathogen Detection Lab

PDL was funded by NCRR under the direction of Dr. Lerche to develop and offer testing for nonhuman primates to develop specific pathogen free colonies and improve overall nonhuman primate colony health.

PDL now functions as both a research and diagnostic laboratory, and provides testing for SPF colonies.

Over the years, the assays developed by PDL have been widely applied and resulted in more accurate and efficient diagnostic tests leading to specific pathogen free and better characterized nonhuman primate colonies. PDL has also taken a leading role in technology transfer to other nonhuman primate institutions by providing training, characterized controls and reagents, and proficiency testing.

We strive at developing new and improved tests as science and technology advance leading to the discovery of new pathogens and more sophisticated technologies.